March 2024

If Jesus rose on the “third day,” why is Easter only two days after Good Friday?

Nowadays we mark holidays and anniversaries with modern grid-style calendars, but in ancient times people marked time in other ways: length of days, moon cycles, weather patterns, etc. Today we acknowledge midnight as the beginning of a new day, but in Jesus’s time a new day began at sunset. This is why our Easter Vigil is held on Saturday night, after sunset – technically, for ancient Jews, Saturday’s Vigil is the beginning of Sunday! But this doesn’t answer the question: why are there only two days between Good Friday and Easter Sunday? Or even one day, if we consider that the Good Friday and Easter Vigil services are only 25 hours apart?

According to the synoptic gospels (Mark 15:34, Matthew 27:46, Luke 23:44), Jesus died around 3pm. This is considered “the first day.” We mark the first day as the day of the passion, so when morning breaks on Saturday we are in “the second day,” the day that Jesus descended to the dead. Finally, Jesus is resurrected on “the third day,” which begins at sunset. – Vicar Aaron Musser

If Jesus rose on the “third day,” why is Easter only two days after Good Friday? Read More »

I want to know why!!!

The disciples in our passage this week want a few more details.  Jesus makes clear that no one knows about the day or the hour…not even angels!  The only thing they can do is stay awake. The reality is that sometimes the time and energy we spend contemplating ‘why’ draws us away from other life-giving things.  Where else could your energy, attention and care be offered?  This is not just redirection, it can wake us up to all kinds of things that God is doing, right here, right now!

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If we are commanded to love sacrificially, does that mean we cannot draw boundaries?

I’ll start with my own wondering about how we define sacrificial love.  Too often, we think about love as just doing the thing that feels best in the moment or that will make the person in front of us feel better.  In other words, we are measuring by our feeling or by the other person’s reaction. This kind of loving is exhausting and we often end up pouring out more and more.  In contrast, the commandment to love measures according to the love we have received from God- it is a love that challenges, comforts, clarifies, and holds accountable.  Knowing we are deeply loved by God transforms our interactions with God and our neighbors.

If we are commanded to love sacrificially, does that mean we cannot draw boundaries? Read More »